Pain Medicine

ShareRepetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) significantly reduced phantom limb pain in patients who had lost limbs to land mine explosions for up to 15 days, according to a study in the Journal of Pain (2016 ;17:911-918). Sixty-three percent of patients experienced a greater than 50% reduction in pain. No significant side effects were reported. Read the full article at Anesthesiology News...

Case Study: Depression and Bipolar Disorder

ShareA 26-year-old graduate student at a rigorous university, Christina was having trouble keeping up with her studies due to a lack of interest, fatigue and feelings of hopelessness – signs of depression and bipolar disorder. Referred by her psychiatrist, she came to the TMS Center of Colorado for an evaluation, desperately hoping for some relief. Christina had already tried numerous prescription drugs to deal with depression and bipolar disorder, including the prescription drugs Klonopin, Wellbutrin and Vyvanse, along with a three-month course of psychotherapy. As part of her evaluation, Christina was tested for depression and anxiety. Her Beck Depression Inventory-II® (BDI) score was 34, which is categorized as severe depression. On the Patient Health Questionnaire-9® (PHQ-9) for depression, she scored 16, which is categorized as moderately severe depression. Christina’s Beck Anxiety Inventory® (BAI) score was a 19, which is just below the cutoff for moderate anxiety. Based on her treatment history and test scores, Christina was recommended for a six-week course of treatment with Brainsway® deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) that was carried out at the TMS Center of Colorado. Christina received a total of 30 dTMS treatments over seven weeks. After less than two weeks of treatment, her depression and anxiety assessment scores dropped significantly, and she reported feeling “awesome” and waking up without a feeling of “dread.” Within five weeks of starting treatment, Christina’s depression scores indicated a remission of depression, and her anxiety assessment score had dropped to a 3, which is considered negligible. By the end of treatment, her depression scores indicated full remission, and her anxiety levels were greatly decreased. During the second half...

Case Study: Severe Depression

ShareLexi, a 22-year-old female, was referred to TMS Center of Colorado for treatment of severe depression and anxiety by another doctor. At the time she got her doctor’s referral, she was unable to attend college, had strong suicidal thoughts and was hospitalized three times in 12 months for depression. Lexi had suffered from depression and anxiety since age 16 and had a strong family history of mental illness on both sides of her family. To help deal with this, she had tried eleven different prescription medications, including Prozac, Cymbalta and Abilify. She also took vitamin D, multivitamins, fish oil and exercised regularly to try and make things better. The prescription drugs made little difference, and they often made Lexi irritable and unable to get a good night’s sleep. She had also been through many years of once-a-week counseling with several different therapists. The sessions were helpful in a general way, but they didn’t really help at all with her depression and anxiety. At her initial TMS evaluation, Lexi’s depression test score was 31, which is in the “severe depression” category on the Beck Depression Inventory®-II index, one of the most widely used tests for measuring depression. Her anxiety test using the Beck Anxiety Inventory® was 39, a score that means severe anxiety. Based on her test results and evaluation, TMS Center of Colorado treated Lexi with a series of Brainsway® deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) sessions over a period of eight weeks. Lexi received a total of 35 dTMS sessions, and she started to see promising results. In just the first week, her depression and anxiety were getting better,...